posthumanism

Wind Beneath My Surgical Wings, Part 2

Can science give us the wings we've always envied in birds? Can plastic surgery elevate us to a higher human form? In this episode, Robert and Julie discuss Joseph Rosen's posthuman philosophy and ponder what we'd have to do to transform arms into wings. Learn all about it in this classic episode of STBYM.

Wind Beneath My Surgical Wings, Part 1

Can science give us the wings we've always envied in birds? Can plastic surgery elevate us to a higher human form? In this episode, Robert and Julie discuss Joseph Rosen's posthuman philosophy and ponder what we'd have to do to transform arms into wings. Learn all about it in this classic episode of STBYM.

Blow Your Mind: Wind Beneath My Surgical Wings

Can modern science give us the wings we've always envied in the birds of the air? Can modern plastic surgery elevate us to a higher human form? In what's probably one of our stranger episodes of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Julie and I discuss the post-human philosophy of leading plastic surgeon Joseph Rosen and the invisible line between surgical correction and surgical transformation.

Science and Art: Disgusting Human Bodies of the Future

I love collisions of science and art, especially when they speculate on the future of the human race. Thus, as brought to my attention by HowStuffWorks' Jonathan Strickland, the Science Gallery in Dublin, Ireland is currently hosting the exhibit "HUMAN+" about the future of our species.

The Werewolf Principle: Adapting Humans for Space

The Werewolf Principle: Will astronauts of the future be able to adapt their physiology for long-term space travel and life on other planets? In this classic STBYM episode, Robert and Julie explore the ideal physical modifications that could theoretically create the world's best astronaut. 'The Werewolf Principle' cover image by artist Ian Miller

Blow Your Mind: The Werewolf Principle

Outer space is rough. If it had a Yelp profile, users would probably give it one star, raving about the view but decrying the nausea, bone loss and nightmare toilets. But is this common sense or diva-like behavior? Instead of changing space or terraforming other worlds to meet humanity's ridiculously specific backstage rider, should we maybe just change the space traveler? Yep, in the latest episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Julie and I contemplate what sci-fi author Clifford D. Simak dubbed "The Werewolf Principle" -- the concept of using technology and medical science to alter the human form to better meet the harsh demands of space travel.

Space Music: Sun Ra and Afrofuturism

It's Black History Month, so is there a better time to discuss the space music of Sun Ra? Stick to the facts and you have in Herman Poole Blount (Ra's birth name) a highly prolific and influential black musician. Take the artist at his word and you have a being from another planet, come to Earth to save us with a message of cosmic liberation. As always, it's best to tread a middle path between the reality and the myth. In this post we'll explore Sun Ra's origins and contributions, as well as just what Afrofuturism is all about. So don your favorite space robe and light-up Egyptian headpiece because we've quite the celestial crash course ahead of us.

Science is Scary (Steampunk isn't)

Sure, steampunk makes for adorable costumes and some snazzy-looking gadgets, but is it really the stuff of haunted houses? Pittsburgh's ScareHouse seems to think so, but just when is science terrifying and when does it merely promise us jazzy retro bikes?

Welcome to the Semantic Apocalypse

I find that much of what I read regarding neuroscience stirs the unsettling notion that the human experience itself is little more than an absurd dream, a strange byproduct of evolution. Canadian author R. Scott Bakker ruminates on these topics, weaving imagined worlds with philosophic discourse and neurological research. In his book "Neuropath," he refers to something he calls "the semantic apocalypse." This catastrophe occurs when science shines enough light on the human condition for reason to fail.