life

The Habitable Epoch

The Habitable Epoch: What if we're wrong. What if life isn't a rarity in a dead cosmos, but rather a common occurrence in the habitable epoch 10 to 20 million years after the Big Bang? Explore the mind-blowing possibility with Robert and Julie.

Mazes

Mazes: Join Robert and Julie once more for their classic series on mazes and labyrinths. In this episode, enter the Minoan maze and wander its endless halls. Feel your heart race. Feel your limbs quiver as the minotaur's roar echoes through the walls. Explore the world of mazes and how they affect the brains of humans and rats.

We've all heard about panspermia, in which the building blocks of life theoretically travel to Earth from elsewhere in the universe. But where does all that stuff come from? In this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Julie and Robert glimpse inside the nebulae of creation.

'Life' Debuts This Sunday

If you're privileged enough to live in the U.K., then you were all into "Life" back in November. Yeah, you Brits have already glutted yourself on groundbreaking documentary footage, wept at the sight of pelicans gobbling down gannets and gasped as the time-lapse starfish clip caused you to spill cold cider on yourselves. Now it's time for U.S. audiences to gape in amazement.

With the threat of nuclear annihilation hanging over their heads, governments, companies and even individual families invested in fallout shelters during the 1960s. If worst came to worst, they could descend into their provisioned holes and hope to eventually emerge to reclaim a ravaged world. Yet even the worst scenarios for man-made Armageddon at the time couldn't hold a candle to what Earth endured approximately 3.9 billion years ago, during the Hadean Eon. Due to a little orbital readjustment among our solar system's gas giants, our planet was pelted with a barrage of meteor strikes. The damage was catastrophic, melting the surface to magma. Our oldest rocks formed in these days, and the earliest signs of life emerged in the wake of the destruction -- or so we've long believed.