human evolution

From the Vault: Humanzee

Chimpanzees are humanity's closest living relative, but there's both wonder and existential horror in that closeness. A species barrier separates us from the rest of the animal kingdom, but what if a chimp/human hybrid were to bridge that barrier? Join Robert Lamb and Christian Sager as they explore the case history of Russian biologist Ilya Ivanovich Ivanov and his attempts to breed a human/chimp hybrid in the early 20th century. (Originally published Jan. 21, 2016)

Humanzee: Breaking the Species Barrier

Chimpanzees are humanity's closest living relative, but there's both wonder and existential horror in that closeness. A species barrier separates us from the rest of the animal kingdom, but what if a chimp/human hybrid were to bridge that barrier? Join Robert and Christian as they explore the case history of Russian biologist Ilya Ivanovich Ivanov and his attempts to breed a human/chimp hybrid in the early 20th century.

The Fist Punch Theory of Evolution

Did the human fist evolve to punch faces? Did our faces evolve to take punches? In this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Robert and Christian explore University of Utah biologist David Carrier's research into human evolution -- including his 2015 study that involves a cadaver-armed punching machine.

Space Music: In the Flesh with Blanck Mass

Art Spotlight: 'Two Mothers' by Faivre

Your Fists Were Made For Punching

Did the human hand evolve this way in order to punch people in the face? Find out in this blog post from Robert Lamb.

Blow Your Mind: Mitochondrial Eve

There's something awe-inspiring about the prospect of a primordial mother figure, a lone women that all human lineages trace back to. Far from a mere mythological tale, however, scientists actually discovered such a woman - and her ghost resides in the genetics of every human being alive today. In this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Julie and I get to know Mitochondrial Eve.

Evolution headlines may not pack the same punch that they once did*, but that hasn't stopped everyone from jumping on the "missing link" bandwagon on this particular slow news day in May. All the fuss is over "Ida," the 47-million-year-old lemur-like creature discovered in Germany in the 1980s. For most of that time, it lingered in a private collection, but now, decades later, this fossil is finally in the spotlight. Yep, there's already a book deal, a David Attenborough documentary, an American Museum of Natural History display and a snazzy website to help promote it. Can a Burger King promotion be that far off?