The Chinese Typewriter (with Tom Mullaney)


Propaganda poster featuring Chinese typist, March 1956. Image courtesy Thomas S. Mullaney

Where the technolingustic systems of the west meet the non-alphabetic written characters of the east, the Chinese typewriter emerges. It’s a story of technological innovation, linguistic imperialism and China’s 19th and 20th century struggle over national identity. Join Robert and Joe as they chat with Thomas S. Mullaney about his book “The Chinese Typewriter: A History.”

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Outside Content:

The Chinese Typewriter: A History (Amazon.com)

T.S. Mullaney | Reflections from 一 to 龠

Tom Mullaney (Stanford Profile)

This typewriter, model 100D-T, was made by Nippon Type in Japan in the late 1970s. It came complete with a copy stand, six cases of Chinese character-type, type tray layout charts, spare ribbons, type tweezers and an instruction booklet.
This typewriter, model 100D-T, was made by Nippon Type in Japan in the late 1970s. It came complete with a copy stand, six cases of Chinese character-type, type tray layout charts, spare ribbons, type tweezers and an instruction booklet.
Photo by SSPL/Getty Images

Topics in this Podcast: language, technology, China