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genetics

Geneticists Plot Hyper-Aggressive Wasps

 Geneticists Plot Hyper-Aggressive Wasps

Scientists are exploring aggressive genes in wasps and, yes, they're looking to possibly create a hyper-aggression wasp. See more »

Monster of the Week: The Tyranid Genestealer

 Monster of the Week: The Tyranid Genestealer

What's the science behind the Genestealer Tyranids of the Warhammer 40,000? Robert Lamb blogs up an answer in this Monster of the Week post. See more »

 U.S. Senator Battles Human-Animal Hybrids

I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that most of us are staunchly against the idea of genetically engineering a race of half man, half animal monsters. Centaur fetishist aside (look it up, folks), I think the rest of us have seen enough sci-fi and horror flicks to know where you draw the line. So do we really need a U.S. law? See more »

 Genetic Breakthrough May Let You Saddle up a Zebra

Want to ride a zebra like Tanya Roberts in "Sheena, Queen of the Jungle?" Well, a little genetics stands in the way of that, and a team of scientists claim to have discovered the very genes responsible. See more »

 Scientists Unlock the Tooth Garden

Our bodies possess remarkable natural healing capabilities. Throw in a little modern medical science and our ability to bounce back from an injury looks even better. Broken bones fuse back together. Ageing eyes return to 20/20 vision. With a few snips, a doctor can even re-string a major-league pitcher's throwing arm. When it comes to our teeth, however, our options are far more limited. Lose an adult tooth and there's no growing it back. But is there another way? According to a BBC science article, a team of U.S. scientists at Oregon State University may have discovered the key to growing new teeth in a laboratory. They successfully pinpointed a gene in mice responsible for the production of the hard, enamel coating that give our chompers their bite. In addition to playing a role in nerve and skin development, the Ctip2 gene plays a key role in the production of ameloblasts, the cells that secrete enamel. See more »

 Hyena Poop > Mummies

Archeologists recently discovered the oldest human hairs ever found in a pile of fossilized hyena poop. Between 195,000 and 257,000 years ago, some hapless hunter-gatherer wound up in the belly of the scavenger and subsequently on the floor of a cave in present day South Africa. See more »

 Science Laughs At Your Wiener Dog

We've been snickering at our wiener dogs and their short little legs since the 15th century and yet genetic science has only recently allowed us to understand exactly why they're so cute. See more »

 Did Neanderthals Get It On With Humans?

As millions scrambled for gifts or grumbled bitterly in the final 48 hours leading up to Valentine's Day, BBC News reported that any Neanderthal wooing of Homo sapiens likely resulted in heartbreaking rejection. See more »